Gear and Beer no image

Published on February 18th, 2014 | by Hilary DelRoss

0

Gear and Beer: Lowa Renegade GTX Mid, Mountainsmith Glissade 7075 Trekking Poles, Citizen Cider Unified Press

By Hilary DelRoss

Lowa Renegade GTX Mid

lowa boot

Waterproof? Check. Durable? Check. Versatile? Check. The Renegade GTX Mid by European company Lowa hits the mark on the attributes you’d expect in a hiking boot and still gets it right when it comes to comfort. Out of the box this boot is roomy, yet supportive, in all the right places. The toe box offers enough space to let your tootsies breath without allowing them to slam against the front of the boot when pointed downhill. The ankle is supportive when you need it but not suffocating. These boots are lightweight, coming in at under 2 pounds for the pair (2.5 pounds for men’s sizes) thanks to their foot wrapping midsole, but stable without being so rigid that you can’t feel features under the Vibram  Evo outer sole. A four-season option thanks to the Gore-tex liner, this footwear offers security from the elements while snowshoeing, hiking, or running errands during mud season. Men, women, and juniors can find the right fit in a variety of widths for those of us who want all the bells and whistles without sacrificing comfort. As a bonus to us fashion conscious outdoors-men and -women, the leather uppers come in a rainbow of colors.

$225

 

Mountainsmith Glissade 7075 Trekking Poles

Improved balance, safety, comfort, and speed are just a few of the benefits of incorporating trekking poles into your winter sports. The Glissade trekking pole is Mountainsmith’s snow-specific option, designed for ease of use in the backcountry. The molded EVA grips are easy to hang on to with mittened hands and are extended for ascents in powder, while carbide tips grip ice for extra traction. A twist lock mechanism allows quick length adjustment if you run into variable terrain. Twist the two pole sections in opposite directions to unlock, telescope to adjust the length, then twist back to lock in place. When compressed, this pair packs down to 26 inches and can extend up to 54 inches for you taller powderhounds. Made of aluminum, they weigh in at 1 pound, 5 ounces—not ultra-light but still comfortable after several hours—and they’re quite durable. Removable, click-on snow baskets are rated to -15 degrees F and are included with rubber tips so you can trek with these puppies all year long. Keep the Glissade handy for added stability in any number of Vermont’s multitudinous conditions and bounding terrain.

$45

By Hilary DelRoss

Citizen Cider Unified Press

_MG_9748

Is cider the new beer? A glance at the draft menu at your local watering hole or down the aisles at your favorite beverage retailer certainly proves the hard cider segment is growing and, more often than not, you’ll see this offering by Citizen Cider in the line up at Vermont establishments. Unified Press, Citizen’s flagship release, has quickly become a favorite and for good reason. Light and slightly effervescent in the glass and on the palate, Unified Press goes down easy on its own or paired with your favorite localvore cuisine. This slightly sweet (or ‘off-dry’ for the connoisseurs out there) libation touts a clean and refreshing taste, 6.8 percent ABV and is gluten-free, making it a great choice for drinking in a variety of occasions. Available in multiple formats, I like the 16-ounce can for its packability on my next excursion. Without much effort, you can find this blend of apples—grown and pressed in Vermont—on tap, in 22-ounce bottles or 16-ounce cans across the Green Mountain State and also in Massachusetts, North Carolina, and Chicago. If you’re local, check out their new, expanded cidery and tasting room in Burlington’s South End and fill a 64- or 32-ouncebootlegger. The company’s motto is printed at the lip of every can: Get Excidered, you say? Don’t mind if I do!


About the Author

Hilary grew up in southern New England where she developed her love of nature and outdoor recreation, including learning to ski at Rhode Island's only ski hill. After exploring the Rocky and Cascade mountain ranges, she transplanted to the Green Mountain State where she snowboards, skis, hikes, bikes, kayaks and stokes campfires from her home base in Montpelier.



Comments are closed.

Back to Top ↑
  • Read the July Issue!